He who lives by the crystal ball soon learns to eat ground glass.
It takes considerable knowledge just to realize the extent of your own ignorance.
The only abnormality is the incapacity to love.
Forgiveness is the key to action and freedom.

Fun Fact: I love purple walls.

My building is the Hogwarts of FSU.

My building is the Hogwarts of FSU.

- Kristina Makeeva

Kristina Makeeva

Meeeeee.

Meeeeee.

- Christopher Cove

- Christopher Cove

- Luis Valadares

Luis Valadares

- Kelly Chin

- Kelly Chin

- Ömür Kahveci

Ömür Kahveci

Dumbledore and the Power to Sacrifice

I wrote another thing on my other blog. Here’s a bit:

Words matter a lot in the Wizarding World. A word can unlock a door, disarm or torture an enemy, and command a broomstick to ascend. The taboo against speaking Voldemort’s name is illustrative of the power of language in Harry Potter. Rowling constructs a binary of bravery in regard to Voldemort’s name. Those who engage in euphemistic sidestepping are cowards at worst, conventional at best. Those—like Dumbledore, Harry, Lupin, and Sirius—who avoid aggrandizing him with phrases like ‘The Dark Lord’ and ‘You-Know-Who’ and ‘He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named’ are natural leaders, beacons of stability and moral authority. And so it goes that to combat an enemy, one must first know he is there. This is why Dumbledore explicitly tells his students at the End of Year Feast in The Goblet of Fire of Cedric’s murder at the hand of Voldemort. From there, Dumbledore engages in minor skirmishes with the Ministry of Magic to spread knowledge of Voldemort’s return. For a year, he faces accusations of madness. For a year, his resolve never waivers. Dumbledore knows he is right and he’s willing to do anything to bring people to his way of thinking. This makes him as dangerous as Voldemort in key ways.

Dumbledore walks a fine line between waging a counterpropaganda campaign against (large portions of) the Ministry and commanding one side of a shadow war against the Death Eaters. To maintain equilibrium between public/private affairs, Dumbledore resorts to many of the same tactics as his enemy. Fudge is depicted as increasingly paranoid after Voldemort’s return. He fears what a return would do to his authority. At the same time, he fears Dumbledore is making moves to depose him. Fudge is right to worry on both counts, though most fans do not see Dumbledore as the regime-changing type. Consider, however, Dumbledore’s prominence (which he uses to full effect). A highly decorated, deeply entrenched senior official on most bodies of merit in the Wizarding World speaks from his various pulpits the truth of Voldemort’s return. He denounces the Ministry for its lack of acknowledgement, much less its preparation. 

- guerel sahin

guerel sahin

- Iurie Belegurschi

Iurie Belegurschi